Xylitol chewing gum.

- This page lists xylitol chewing gum brands that we're aware of that contain a reasonably high amount of the compound. We also explain how to compare products when their labeling doesn't specifically state how much xylitol they contain.

 

Chewing gum may make the best xylitol delivery system.

Gum can be an excellent way to create your daily needed exposure of xylitol.

In fact, a large percentage of studies that have evaluated its effectiveness in preventing tooth decay have chosen this method as their delivery mechanism.


There's an added benefit to using gum.

Beyond the fact that gum is convenient to use and creates a sustained xylitol exposure, the act of chewing something (most anything really, not only gum) creates an anti-cavity effect on its own.

So when picking the best way to create your needed daily exposure, why not choose a method that can provide all of the extra benefits possible? This page explains...

Xylitol chewing gum products.

We performed a web search in an attempt to identify some of the higher-quality brands of chewing gum that are available.

We found good and bad products.

Our search revealed that there seem to be two tiers of manufacturers:

  • Those whose goal is to produce top-quality effective items.
  • And those who skimp on xylitol content yet are still eager to boast that their product does indeed contain it.

Look for gum products that provide 1 gram or more of xylitol per serving.

Xylitol chewing gum.

(With this brand, 2 pieces = 1 serving.)

Even some of the better products we found had poor labeling.

We were surprised to find that some manufacturers of high-content products seemed to feel that documenting this fact on their gum's packaging was not important.

We wonder, how can a manufacturer who has gone to the trouble of creating a decent quality product not understand that a person needs to be able to judge their per-day xylitol consumption in order to create an optimal anti-cavity effect? Oh well.

Some of the best xylitol gums we found.

The following table contains a list of chewing gums we've identified (or readers have discovered) whose xylitol content is reasonably high and easy to find documented (preferably on the product's labeling). This list isn't intended to be all-inclusive. (If you know of other well-documented items, please leave a note in the comments section below.)
 

Chewing Gum Brand Xylitol Content
(grams per piece)
Epic Xylitol Gum 1.06
ElimiTaste Zapp 1
Xyloburst Gum 1
Branam Xylitol Gum 1
Xyla Gum 1
Zellies 1
Pur Gum 1
Dr. John's Fruit Gum .9
BioGenesis Fruit Gum .77
Xponent .72
Xlear Spry Gum .72


Things we noticed.

  • Most of the better chewing gum products seem to deliver about one gram of xylitol per piece.
     
  • Be careful when comparing the labeling found on different products. Xylitol content is often stated in terms of "grams per serving." In the case of chewing gum, you may find that a single serving size is either one or possibly two pieces of gum.

Picking out the best gums by reading their ingredient list.

The graphic below (#1) shows the ingredient list found on a package of gum.

#1: Ingredients found in a xylitol chewing gum.

Ingredients in a xylitol chewing gum.

With xylitol listed first, it's fairly safe to assume that this brand of gum is a quality product.

Just by looking at it, you could guess that this product probably contains a significant amount of xylitol (possibly as much as one gram or so).

This assumption comes from the fact that xylitol is listed as this product's primary ingredient and a one-gram-per-stick dosing is common (see our table above).

 

#2: Ingredients in lower quality xylitol chewing gum product.

Ingredients in lower quality xylitol chewing gum product.

The inclusion of a second sweetener (manitol) in this gum suggests that its xylitol level is comparatively low.

In comparison, here's is the ingredient list of a product that we would consider to be somewhat suspect (#2).

We base this opinion on the fact that a second type of sugar is listed.

Other sweeteners (manitol, sorbitol) are cheaper to use, so some manufacturers will skimp on xylitol content in favor of using these lower-cost alternatives.

 

#3: Ingredients in a suspect xylitol chewing gum product.

Ingredients in a suspect xylitol chewing gum product.

The fact that this gum lists another sugar (sorbitol) ahead of xylitol suggests that it's a low-quality product.

Here's a product (#3) that has an ingredient list that we would consider extremely suspect.

Without documentation to the contrary, it seems unlikely that the amount of xylitol found in this product could be considered to be an effective dosing.

This opinion is based on the fact that sorbitol (a cheaper sweetener) is the first listed ingredient. Xylitol is a distant third.


 
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Input from site visitors.

Xylitol information

Thank you for this site - it had everything I wanted to know!

sugar alcohols

What are these sugar alcohols on products such as power bars. They are not listed as part of the total carbohydrates. Presumably this is to sell to people who are on a low or reduced carbohydrate diet.

Are they actually carbohydrates? I assume they are typically sorbitol and mantel.
Where do sugar alcohols fit in one's overall nutritional needs?

MaryEllen,

I'm not really all that familiar with this type of product, so I looked it up on the web (choosing the brand that had this exact wording in it's name).

These items seem to contain high levels of (cavity-casuing) sugars, primarily glucose and fructose. Evidently that's the whole idea.

The ones I saw typically listed one of these sugars first in the ingredient list, and really no mention of xylitol at all.
So clearly this isn't the type of product you should consider for a xylitol source. (A chewing gum, like described above would make an infinitely better choice.)

In regard to sugar alcohols and dietary needs, I'm not really going to have an answer.

You'll notice that suggested levels of xylitol use for the prevention of tooth decay (the topic of this website) are very low.
So in regard to dietary needs, it seems that the addition or subtraction of this amount to your daily diet is unlikely to play any significant role.

And yes, xylitol (a sugar alcohol) is a type of carbohydrate (a molecule made up of carbon, hydrogen and oxygen).

Xylitol gum

"Pur" is a gum made in Canada which lists 2grams of xylitol per piece. It is carried by Whole Foods but is much more expensive than "Spry".

Thank you for the contribution Bonny.

We were able to view a photo of the labeling on a Pur package. The 2 grams amount refers to the content of a serving of two individual pieces of gum.

Since our table above is organized on a per-piece basis, we've listed Pur there as having 1 gram xylitol content.

To be fair to Pur, we saw online sources that had Pur and Spry priced similarly on a per-piece basis. And considering that Pur has 1 gr xylitol content per piece and Spry only .72 gr, it seems the better deal.

We do realize that the pricing we see online may be entirely different than what you are able to find locally in your own store.

Thanks again for the input.

other ingredients in good gums,,'natural flavors'??

Any research on what 'natural flavors' means in a lot of the gums with xylitol? Also, titanium dioxide is in some of the brands and according to Dr. Mercola: Titanium dioxide is often used as a whitening agent in chewing gum, but it's been linked to autoimmune disorders, asthma, and Crohn's disease and is potentially carcinogenic – especially in its nanoparticle form.
Any research on this?

We don't have any specific

We don't have any specific additional information to share.

Getting xylitol dosings via chewing gum can make a good choice because: 1) The exposure is created over a prolonged period of time and 2) The act of chewing gum stimulates the flow a saliva (which has its own anti-cavity effect).

But just sprinkling granular xylitol on and in foods and beverages can create a similar effect, and by doing so you don't have to introduce any new compounds into your diet. So for those concerned, that might make the best approach.

uxlitol

I watched a program on TV featuring the benefits of xylitol. It showed children in finland freely taking a piece of chewing gum covered in a xylitol substance to clean their mouths from bacteria after a meal at school. the program was extoling the virtues of including xylitol in your diet.

Sharleen

It's nice to hear that people are taking effort to spread the word. By the way, Finland was the country where the anti-cavity benefits of xylitol use were first discovered and researched.

Sorbitol

Sorbitol is not just "a cheaper sweetener"; in one of the same studies that showed benefits of xylitol
<h t t p : / / w w w . n c b i . n l m . n i h . g o v / p u b m e d / 1 2 9 1 1 8 5 >,
sorbitol gum also reduced plaque index and had a superior effect on gingival health.

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