Other types of xylitol products.

- Besides gum, there are lots of other kinds of consumables that can be used as a xylitol source. These include mints, candies, lollipops and even chocolates. Our tables list products and brands that we've identified as having a reasonably high xylitol content.

 

Advantages.

Like gum, these types of items offer some advantages as a delivery system.


Unlike toothpaste or a rinse, they (and thus the xylitol they release) remain in your mouth over a fairly extended period of time as you enjoy them. And, in general, just having any type of food item in your mouth creates additional anti-cavity benefits.

How to choose a quality product.

Pretty much everything we've stated about how to pick out a quality chewing gum applies to the types of products listed on this page. To recap:

Xylitol candies.

Xylitol candy.

Note: Some products may only offer 1/2 gram of xylitol per piece.

1) Look for documented xylitol content.

Look for products whose packaging states that they contain a significant amount of xylitol, possibly in the range of .5 to 1 gram per piece.

You'll find a lot of confusion in regard to "serving sizes" with these types of products. Unlike pieces of gum which tend to come in relatively standardized servings, mints, candies and the like come in all sorts of bits and pieces. Each individual one may contain a surprising low amount of xylitol. Pay attention to how many pieces will be needed to create a 1 gram exposure.

2) Evaluate the ingredient list.

If you can't find proper documentation on a product's packaging, at least look for one that lists xylitol as its primary ingredient. (Or, if you can, hold out for finding a product that's made by a company that actually respects it's customers enough to provide proper labeling.)

What kinds of products are available?

Here's a listing of some of the different types of higher-content, xylitol-sweetened items we've seen. This list is not meant to be all inclusive. (If you know of any products whose packaging states a content of .5 to 1 gram of xylitol per piece, please leave a comment below.)

Candies Xylitol Content
(grams per piece)
Zellies Junior Bears 1.4
Dr. John's Soft Candy 1
Dr. John's Hard Candy .5
Xyla Hard Candy .5
Zapp Xyla Candy .5
Mints Xylitol Content
(grams per piece)
BioGenesis Xylitol Mints .55
Epic mints .5
Zapp Xyla Mints .5
Dr. John's Peppermints .5
Zellies Mints .5
Xlear Spry Mints .5
Suckers Xylitol Content
Dr. John's Lollipops 1
CariFree CTx1 Lollies 1
Zapp Xyla Lollipops .5
Ballpop Lollipops .5
Chocolates Xylitol Content
Dr. John's Chocolate 5
Zapp Xyla Chocolate 3
Xyla Chocolate 3

While the idea of syrups and jams may seem silly at first, they can provide a safe way to administer xylitol dosings to very young children.

Syrups and Jams Xylitol Content
(grams per tablespoon)
Nature's Hollow Jam 5
Xyla Jam 5
Nature's Hollow Honey 5
Nature's Hollow Syrup 4.5
Xlear Spry Preserves 3


 
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Input from site visitors.

XXXXXXX made by XXXXXX

The ADHA site for dental professionals offers samples of XXXXX to their members to hand out to patients, and says each mint contains nearly 1 gram of Xylitol. The nice thing is that these are readily available in the regular mints section of any chain drugstore.

jvm

Thanks for taking the time to post. We really do appreciated it.

We've X'ed out the name of the product you've mentioned because we feel we cannot add it to our list above.

This website is about the use of xylitol in preventing cavities. A giant component of achieving that has to do with monitoring your daily dosing of it.

We found images of the product you mentioned (front and back) on CVS.com (thank you CVS).

While we thoroughly believe that the mints are formulated with xylitol as you describe, nowhere on the packaging of this product is the word xylitol mentioned.

We do see the phrase sugar alcohols less than 1g, which correlates with your statement. But we hardly see how this information helps the average consumer understand the xylitol exposure they are getting.

We will also state that the page on the company's website that describes this product does not state precisely what it's xylitol content is. And also a second sugar alcohol is listed as an ingredient. (Which opens up the question, what portion of the less than 1g of sugar alcohols is actually xylitol?)

We'd love to be wrong and have another product to add to our table. But without evidence to the contrary, we simply feel we cannot add this one because they are not forthright about the xylitol level provided.

Much appreciated

Thanks for doing such thorough and fast research!

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